Link copied!

Comment reported!

Thank you for keeping applescoop.org safe 😃

Privacy respecting comments? Check!

We developed our own custom comment system, Instant Reply, to deliver a tracker-free, fast and easy experience! No sign up required.

Posting a comment will make you leave the tour.

Speaking

Many popular apps still don’t have native Apple Silicon support

95%
8 min read
Comments
  • Since Apple announced the transition away from Intel processors, only some apps have made the transition themselves.
  • Some popular apps such as Google Chrome and Photoshop have already gained support.
  • Most apps without native support are still compatible via Rosetta 2.



Just over a year ago, Apple announced that it will be switching from Intel processors in its Macs to custom silicon chips over the next two years. These new chips are much more efficient and have since proven they are here to stay. Now, with Apple more than halfway into this transition, many users are finally switching over and using the new Macs. It is known by many that one of the only reasons to not buy a new Mac right now, besides the cost, of course, is that if you are using many pro applications, some of your apps may not be supported on these new chips yet. This has become less of an issue than it was in the fall when the first Apple Silicon Macs were released, but it is still an issue for some pro users.

For most apps that have not yet gained native support, Apple created Rosetta 2, which makes it possible for apps originally intended for Intel processors to work on these new Macs. Even though this exists, some apps reportedly have much worse performance than on Intel Macs, and some just don’t work altogether. For the average consumer, though, this method is okay and will work most of the time.

Starting right when the first Apple Silicon Macs were released this past fall, big apps such as Google Chrome and Final Cut Pro adopted native support right away. But for most apps, it has taken longer. Now, over a year after the transition was announced, nearly half of all popular apps have not yet released a native version for Apple Silicon Macs. On a website created by developer-services company Mac Stadium, it has been reported that many apps still do not support Apple Silicon in any way, even via Rosetta 2. The website has found only just over 500 apps with native support. Although this may seem like not very many, new apps are being added daily, and many others are available now via Rosetta 2.

Although many still don’t have support, popular apps such as Photoshop and Microsoft Word have recently gained native support. Also, just recently, it was reported that Spotify will be releasing a new version of their desktop app with native Apple Silicon support very soon.

Here is a list of some popular apps that already have native Apple Silicon support:

  • Google Chrome
  • Adobe Photoshop
  • 1Password
  • GitHub Desktop
  • Visual Studio Code
  • Opera
  • Microsoft Word
  • Slack
  • Telegram
  • zoom.us

A full list is available iPad and iPhone natively! They, on average, also have better battery life than their Intel counterparts. The list of Apple Silicon Macs available now is increasing, and currently includes the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro 13”, Mac Mini, and iMac 24”.




Stories related to Apple Silicon

New MacBook Airs and MacBook Pro set to get M3 chip

82% reliable | 3 minute read

Outlook for Mac now available for free

100% reliable | 4 minute read

Gurman: New 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Airs coming by WWDC

84% reliable | 5 minute read

New M3 iMac reportedly in production testing

84% reliable | 4 minute read

Apple Silicon Mac Pro, focus on Apple Watch battery life hinted by Apple exec

90% reliable | 4 minute read

Mac ‘Studio’ with M1 Max chip could be a new form factor for the Mac

90% reliable | 5 minute read

Office for Mac update brings full Apple Silicon support for Excel

100% reliable | 3 minute read

Apple Silicon roadmap leak conflicts with previous Mac Pro rumors

79% reliable | 9 minute read

Updated iMac Pro reportedly coming in early 2022

75% reliable | 6 minute read

Alleged photos of M1X MacBook Pro components reveal notch

55% reliable | 3 minute read

Analyst says a third of all MacBook users will upgrade to M1X MacBook Pro

75% reliable | 3 minute read

M1X MacBook Pro models could have 120Hz displays

83% reliable | 5 minute read

Apple announces October 18 ‘Unleashed’ event

100% reliable | 3 minute read

M1X MacBook Pro leaks from Apple Park with 512 GB of storage and up to 32 GB of RAM

82% reliable | 5 minute read

Gurman: M1X MacBook Pros likely coming this month

84% reliable | 5 minute read

Redesigned MacBook Air, housing the next-gen Apple Silicon, to enter mass production in Q3 2022

81% reliable | 6 minute read

M1X MacBook Pros may hit shelves in “the next several weeks”

84% reliable | 4 minute read

Apple will soon sell all 24-inch M1 iMac colors in retail stores

84% reliable | 5 minute read

Rising chip prices are expected to impact Apple

75% reliable | 5 minute read

14-inch MacBook Pro to be more expensive than current model, leaker reports

90% reliable | 5 minute read
More stories

Do iPhones or Androids last longer?

100% reliable | 7 minute read

Which iPhones will stop working in 2024 and 2025? Complete List of Compatible Apple Products

78% reliable | 8 minute read

Apple Watch X: All the rumors so far

73% reliable | 9 minute read

iPhone 16 and iPhone 16 Pro: Top 5 rumors

72% reliable | 9 minute read

Shocking: Apple Vision Pro 2 reportedly 'cancelled'

76% reliable | 6 minute read

iOS 17.6: First public beta released

100% reliable | 3 minute read

Apple launches Apple Pay Later for select users

100% reliable | 6 minute read

New iWork updates bring Apple Pencil hover features and more

100% reliable | 3 minute read

Apple announces WWDC23 coming June 5

98% reliable | 4 minute read

Here's what's new in iOS 16.4

100% reliable | 6 minute read

Apple Music Classical now available

100% reliable | 4 minute read

Gurman: iOS 17 to include several “nice to have features”

84% reliable | 3 minute read


More stories